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South African Artillery (Field Branch) - SAA (Fd)

Ubique - Everywhere; Primus Incedere Exire Ultimus - First In Last Out

 
History

The antecedents of the field and air defence units of today are the numerous volunteer corps that flourished in the Cape Colony from 1855, many of which lasted only a few years and some, less than months. At least two were active in Natal and, after the Anglo/Boer War when the Transvaal became a colony, a volunteer artillery corps was established there. One in each of these three former colonies is still alive today.

Regular units were established in the former republics of the Transvaal and the Free State but they both disappeared during the South African War of 1899-1902. They had fought bravely.

The South African Defence Act of 1912 (Act No. 13 of 1912) gave birth on 1 April 1913 to the five regiments of South African Mounted Rifles (SAMR), all of which were to have included a battery of artillery. Only three batteries were formed due to problems with the supply of guns; World War One had begun in August 1914 and Britain itself needed all the guns it could produce.

On 1 July 1913, three months after the SAMR was established, three volunteer units, one each from the Cape (Cape Field Artillery), Natal (Natal Field Artillery) and the Transvaal (Transvaal Horse Artillery), were incorporated into the Active Citizen Force (ACF), and one, the Cape Garrison Artillery, into the Coast Garrison Force. A new unit, the Durban Garrison Artillery was established on the same date. These units and the three SAMR batteries, together with two ACF batteries raised specially for the campaign, saw action in German South West Africa during the period 1914/1915.

In 1915, two Imperial Service units; titled South African Field Artillery and the South African: Heavy Artillery, were raised from volunteers to fight in France and East Africa respectively. Paid by the British Government, they were not part of the Union Defence Forces but nevertheless added lustre to the already growing reputation of South African Gunners.

The South African Permanent Force, created in 1913 as the Permanent Force and re-designated with effect from 23 February 1923, included two units

  • The South African Field Artillery (SAFA), and
  • The South African Permanent Garrison Artillery (SAPGA)

Both had commenced operations some time before this date; the SAPGA when the coast defences of the Cape Peninsula had been handed over to South Africa in December 1921.

The Governor General by Proclamation No. 246, 1934 changed the style and designation of the SAFA and the SAPGA with effect from 1 September 1934 and created one Corps titled the “South African Artillery”.

This is the Corps that provided field, medium, anti-tank and anti-aircraft units that fought in East Africa, the Western Desert of North Africa and Italy in 1940 – 1945, adding to the reputation established by South African field and heavy artillery units in 1915-1918.

The Artillery Corps consisted of the Field Branch and the Anti-Aircraft Branch but in 1988 the two branches were seperated to become the South African Artillery Corps and the South African Anti-Aircraft Artillery Corps. In 1998 the latter was re-designated Air Defence Artillery. With the creation of the SANDF in 1994, the gunners of the SADF, the former new statutory forces and the former TBVC forces were integrated.

Both the South African Artillery and the Anti-Aircraft Artillery had Directorates to manage the Permanent Force and Citizen Force personnel and units, to manage projects undertaken for the improvement of resources and to generally oversee the well-being of their corps.

This came to an end in 1994 with the complete re-organisation of the Defence Force during which ‘type’ formations were created. Thus today, the field and air defence units are under the command of SA Army Artillery Formation and SA Army Defence Artillery Formation respectively. Each Formation is commanded by a Brigadier General. Both Corps were allied to the Royal Regiment of Artillery on 5 June 1996.

The Official March of the Field branch is: Vuurmonde and that of the Air Defence branch : Alta Pete

Source :The Gunner

 

G-5 Gun/Howitzers
 
Some Artillery Units of the SADF


 
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Members of the South African Artillery Corps on the Roll Of Honour
YearForce NumberRankNameDate Of DeathUnit
1964P48357BdrDu Toit J.A.1964/05/164 Field Training Regiment; 4 Artillery Regiment
1964P52689RfnWepener J.F.1964/05/164 Field Training Regiment; 4 Artillery Regiment
19656315406GnrParsons L.E.1965/03/23Eastern Province Command
196605197975PEWO1Pienaar L.M.J.1966/05/08South African Engineer Corps, attached to School of Artillery
197066341264R2 LtTheron J.J.1970/05/304 Artillery Regiment
197266014234ESgtKlue M.C.1972/04/124 Artillery Regiment; Army Service Corps
197572211717BAGnrRetief M.C.E.1975/11/144 Artillery Regiment
197571537724BC2 LtRobin C.J.1975/11/144 Artillery Regiment
197573560344BAGnrNeethling B.H.1975/12/174 Artillery Regiment
197573292054BAGnrMuller G.M.F.1975/12/2314 Artillery Regiment
197572481856BAGnrTheunissen M.J.1975/12/2314 Artillery Regiment
197673216491BB Gnr Holtzhauzen C.J. 1976/07/0214 Artillery Regiment
197773553401BAPteLentink W.1977/06/2614 Artillery Regiment
197876455690PEGnrHattingh A.1978/02/074 Artillery Regiment
197875474528BG Bdr Loots C. 1978/06/154 Artillery Regiment
197874804113BGGnrVan der Bergh A.J.1978/10/0914 Artillery Regiment
197873241069BGGnrSmit C.H.1978/11/3014 Artillery Regiment
197975546853BG Rfn Mitchell J.J. 1979/06/254 Artillery Regiment
198076385905BGL/BdrNaus M.J.1980/03/0614 Artillery Regiment
198177573145BGGnrJanse van Rensburg C.J.1981/03/1914 Artillery Regiment
198174529884BG Bdr Hassebroek D.H.O. 1981/06/2184 Motorised Brigade
198178520228BG Gnr Levin L.P. 1981/08/0914 Artillery Regiment
198178251287BGGnrLoubser D.J.1981/08/174 Artillery Regiment
198177350411BGL/BdrOlver H.V.L.1981/08/174 Artillery Regiment
198177411569BGL/BdrGrobler H.A.J.1981/08/254 Artillery Regiment
198379576542BGGnrBezuidenhout C.F.1983/03/064 Artillery Regiment; 61 Mechanised Battalion Group
198380526940BGGnrBosse J.1983/03/064 Artillery Regiment; attached to 61 Mechanised Battalion Group
198380571326BGGnrEngelbrecht L.J.1983/04/024 Artillery Regiment; 61 Mechanised Battalion Group
198381421455BGGnrOosthuizen D.P.1983/11/064th South African Infantry, 62 Mechanised Battalion Group
198480325558BGGnrBadenhorst J.J.1984/03/2061 Mechanised Battalion Group
198472472459BTGnrTomes A.L.1984/04/0217 Field Regiment
198581233033BGGnrRautenbach R.J.1985/08/0561 Mechanised Battalion Group
198581021123BGBdrUys H.P.1985/08/08School of Artillery
198770517313PECmdtDu Randt J.C.1987/09/034 Artillery Regiment
198785212520BGGnrBeukman W.G.1987/09/204 South African Infantry Battalion; 61 Mechanised Battalion Group
198783471490BGGnrDe Villiers A.W.1987/10/0861 Mechanised Battalion Group
198783410597BGGnrBiet S.R.1987/10/164 Artillery Regiment
198783429985BG2 LtHoward G.M.1987/10/164 Artillery Regiment
198784350818BGL/BdrMansfield P.1987/10/164 Artillery Regiment
198783610741BGBdrHavenga L M C1987/11/204 Artillery Regiment
198876233832BTGnrRoberts K.A.1988/01/12School of Artillery
198883314088BGGnrStoop S.P.1988/02/0114 Artillery Regiment, attached to 32 Battalion
198884385459BGBdrHendricks C.1988/02/2510 Anti-Aircraft Regiment, attached to 61 Mechanised Battalion Group
198884435338BGGnrVan der Merwe J.P.1988/08/1910 Artillery Brigade
198885349744BGGnrVan Niekerk W.F.1988/08/24Witwatersrand Command Intelligence Section
198885269033BGGnrMeiring A.1988/09/134 Artillery Regiment
198883435180BGGnrEllis S.C.1988/09/1661 Mechanised Battalion Group, 2 Medical Battalion Group
198886628708BGGnrFerreira I.W.1988/09/264 Artillery Regiment
199086461050BGPteTerblanche J.1990/03/0110 Artillery Brigade
199089229462BGGnrRochollz J.H.1990/03/0210 Artillery Brigade
199088597794BG Gnr Koekemoer P.B. 1990/11/084 Artillery Regiment
199178201359BTGnrVan der Merwe P.A.1991/05/0625 Field Regiment
199189251813BGGnrMann G.1991/11/0414 Artillery Regiment
199288327762BGGnrDammert M.P.1992/10/0214 Artillery Regiment
 
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User Posts and Comments
22090
Posted by

Lt Schoemies

on 17 April
 

South African Artillery (Field Branch) - SAA (Fd)

Post your comments on the South African Artillery (Field Branch) - SAA (Fd) here...

...
23943
Posted by

Lt Schoemies

on 12 October

RE: South African Artillery (Field Branch) - SAA (Fd)

Shaun Cato asked on Facebook: If the call sign of the Art Observer is Golf 9 what will the call sign be of this monster?...
23944
Posted by

Lt Schoemies

on 12 October

RE: South African Artillery (Field Branch) - SAA (Fd)

Golf 9 would have been the Regimental Commander (Commandant) of the artillery regiment (Golf is for SA Artillery), which would be close to, or with, the Battle Group Commander (Call sign 9). If the call sign was G29, for example, it would have been the Battery Commander of Quebec Battery (Papa Battery=G10; Quebec Battery=G20; Romeo Battery=G30; Sierra Battery=G40. The OPOs of the batteries all had battery-level call signs, like G15, G15A, G15B, G15C, G25, G25A, G25B, G25C,... etc. Each battery originally comprised of two troops of 4 x 155mm guns each (Later this was reduced to a battery of only six guns)
If the above G-6 formed part of Alpha Troop(call sign G11) of Papa Battery (call sign G10), each of the four gun sections would have its own call sign, i.e G11A, G11B, G11C and G11D. in the case of Bravo Troop the call signs would have been G12A, G12B, G12C and G12D,
If the above G-6 formed part of Charlie Troop(call sign G21) of Quebec Battery (call sign G20), each of the four gun sections would have its own call sign, i.e G21A, G21B, G21C and G21D. in the case of Delta Troop the call signs would have been G22A, G22B, G22C and G22D,
And so on for Echo and Foxtrot Troops of Romeo Battery as well as Golf and Hotel Troops of Sierra Battery.
During Operation Moduler in 1987, the troop of four G-6s (initially 3) was called Juliet Troop, while the attached Multiple Rocket Launcher troop was labeled India Troop. The G-6s would therefore theoretically have had the call signs G52A, G52B, G52C, and G52D, while the four MRLS would have been G51A, G51B, G51C, and G51D.
Here is a photo from Howard Ray Smith of a G-6 at Riemvasmaak in 1987, with call sign G62D, indicating that it is the fourth gun (D) of the Lima Troop (2) of Tango Battery (6) of the School of Artillery (G)...
23945
Posted by

Lt Schoemies

on 12 October

RE: South African Artillery (Field Branch) - SAA (Fd)

Here is the typical Romeo Battery Artillery Radio Diagram as it formed part of Combat Group Charlie during Operation Modulêr in 1987:...
23946
Posted by

Lt Schoemies

on 12 October

RE: South African Artillery (Field Branch) - SAA (Fd)

REGIMENTAL CALL SIGNS...
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Images from 'Grensoorlog' series, produced by Linda de Jager, reproduced with kind permission from MNET
Images from 'Grensoorlog' series, produced by Linda de Jager, reproduced with kind permission from MNET
Images from 'Grensoorlog' series, produced by Linda de Jager, reproduced with kind permission from MNET
Images from 'Grensoorlog' series, produced by Linda de Jager, reproduced with kind permission from MNET
Images from 'Grensoorlog' series, produced by Linda de Jager, reproduced with kind permission from MNET

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